Post From This Category




Six Effects of Enzymes in the Human Body

Six Effects of Enzymes in the Human Body

Do you know when enzymes begin to be produced in the human body? The answer is that they existed during the egg and sperm period. It is also because of the activity of the enzyme that the egg and sperm can be combined. Cell division must use enzyme because the medium,...

5G in new directions just got Weird

5G in new directions just got Weird

Industry group 3GPP takes 5G in new directions in the latest set of standards The only reason you’re able to read this right now is because of the Internet standards created by the Internet Engineering Task Force. So while standards may not always be the most exciting...

Researchers Turning Bricks Into Supercapacitors in 2020

Researchers Turning Bricks Into Supercapacitors in 2020

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis made a fast energy storage device out of common building bricks As solar panels and wind turbines multiply, the big problem is how with how to store all the excess electricity produced when the sun is up or the wind...

Human Sperm Don’t Swim Like We Thought

Human Sperm Don’t Swim Like We Thought

3D microscope reveals that sperm have been fooling scientists for 350 years For more than three centuries scientists have believed that human sperm swim by swishing their tails in a side-to-side, symmetrical motion. But that’s because we’ve been...

Path to Powerful Analog AI found by Startup and Academics

Path to Powerful Analog AI found by Startup and Academics

Equilibrium propagation allows all-analog training Engineers have been chasing a form of AI that could drastically lower the energy required to do typical AI things like recognize words and images. This analog form of machine learning does one of the key mathematical...

Why Sweat Will Power Your Next Wearable

Why Sweat Will Power Your Next Wearable

Biofuel cells can generate enough watts for fitness trackers and health monitors- By Patrick Mercier and Joseph Wang Here’s how a wearable turns sweat into energy: A fuel cell consists of two electrodes—an anode and a cathode—with an electrolyte between them. The fuel...

Spherical Silicon Solar Cells Absorb Scattered Sunlight

Spherical Silicon Solar Cells Absorb Scattered Sunlight

Silicon solar cells folded into spheres hint at solar power's flexibility in even small devices By Jeremy Hsu The spherical solar cell also delivered about 60 percent more power output than its flat counterpart when both could collect only scattered sunlight under a...










Flying Taxi Services in 2023 by Japan -Short-hop flights are close to commercial reality

by | Sep 18, 2020 | Tech News | 0 comments




Last year, Spectrum reported on Japan’s public-private initiative to create a new industry around electric vertical takeoff and landing vehicles (eVTOLs) and flying cars. Last Friday, start-up company SkyDrive Inc. demonstrated the progress made since then when it held a press conference to spotlight its prototype vehicle and show reporters a video taken three days earlier of the craft undergoing a piloted test flight in front of staff and investors.

The sleek, single-seat eVTOL, dubbed SD-03 (SkyDrive third generation), resembles a hydroplane on skis and weighs in at 400 kilograms. The body is made of carbon fiber, aluminum, and other materials that have been chosen for their weight, balance, and durability. The craft measures 4 meters in length and width and is about 2 meters tall. During operation, the nose of the craft is lit with white LED lights; red lights run around the bottom to enable the vehicle to be seen in the sky and to distinguish the direction the craft is flying.

The SD-03 uses four pairs of electrically driven coaxial rotors, with one pair mounted at each quadrant. These enable a flight time of 5 to 10 minutes at speeds up to 50 kilometers per hour. “The propellers on each pair counter-rotate,” explains Nobuo Kishi, Sky Drive’s chief technology officer. “This cancels out propeller torque.” It also makes for a compact design, “so all the craft needs to land is the space of two parked cars,” he adds.

Read Saurabh Kumar's answer to What is the possible way to detox our body? on Quora

But when it came to providing more details of the drive system, Kishi declined, saying it’s a trade secret that’s a source of competitive advantage. The same goes for the craft’s energy storage system: Other than disclosing the fact that the flying taxi currently uses a lithium polymer battery, he’s also keeping details about the powertrain confidential.

Underlying this need for secrecy is the technology’s restricted capabilities. “Total energy that can be stored in a battery is a major limiting factor here,” says Steve Wright, Senior Research Fellow in Avionics and Aircraft Systems at the University of West England. “Which is why virtually every one of these projects is aiming at the air-taxi market within megacities.”

The SkyDrive video shows the SD-03 take off vertically then engage in maneuvers as it hovers up to two meters off the ground around a netted enclosure. The craft is shown moving about at walking speed for roughly 4 minutes before landing on a designated spot. For monitoring purposes and back-up, engineers used an additional computer-assisted control system to ensure the craft’s stability and safety.

SkyDrive Cargo Drone (left), and the SD-03
Photo: John Boyd
SkyDrive’s Cargo Drone (left) and SD-03 VTOL.

In May, SkyDrive unveiled a drone for commercial use that is based on the same drive and power systems as the SD-03. Named the Cargo Drone, it’s able to transport payloads of up to 30 kg and can be preprogrammed to fly autonomously or be piloted manually. It will be operated as a service by SkyDrive, starting at a minimum monthly rental charge of 380,000 yen ($3,600) that rises according to the purpose and frequency of use. 

Kishi says the drone is designed to work within a 3 km range in locations that are difficult or time-consuming to get to by road. For instance, Obayashi Corp., one of Japan’s big five construction companies and an investor in SkyDrive, has been testing the Cargo Drone to autonomously deliver materials like sandbags and timber to a remote, hard-to-reach location.

Fukuzawa established SkyDrive in 2018 after leaving Toyota Motor and working with Cartivator, a group of volunteer engineers interested in developing flying cars. SkyDrive now has a staff of fifty.










200 CIVIL ENGINEERING Interview Questions & Answers

200 CIVIL ENGINEERING Interview Questions & Answers

200 CIVIL ENGINEERING Interview Questions & Answers 1. What are the causes of building collapse?The passage of time is one reason. Buildings also collapse due to weak foundations. Earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters can also damage the structure of...

Tesla Valve Working

Tesla Valve Working

Nikola Tesla had invented a very interesting one-way value. Let's understand the complete physics of this valve in this video. https://youtu.be/suIAo0EYwOE

Jobs in TATA

Jobs in TATA

Search job [wp-rss-aggregator template="govt-job"]

%d bloggers like this: